Development: Business and Soft Power

Upcoming Events

Susan Roberts

Professor, University of Kentucky

Date: Thursday, March 29, 2018
Time: 12:00PM – 3:00PM
Venue: SS2098, Sidney Smith Hall, University of Toronto

Abstract: This talk will focus on contemporary changes in the US’s foreign assistance for development practices. What does “America First” mean for US foreign aid? Is it the predicted “end of foreign aid as we know it”? (the title of an April 2017 article in Foreign Policy). I will revisit evidence and arguments I made in a 2014 paper in the Annals of the AAG about the rise of an industry of development firms involved in delivering US development assistance through contracts and sub-contracts with USAID.

Speaker: Sue Roberts is Associate Provost for Internationalization at the University of Kentucky where she is also Professor of Geography. In 2006 she was awarded the university’s Sturgill Prize for Graduate advising. Sue is a specialist in economic and political geography, with interests in feminist and critical social theory. She has conducted research on a range of subjects, including offshore finance, international development assistance, globalizing non-governmental organizations, and geopolitics. She has published a co-authored book, two co-edited volumes, and numerous papers. Sue has won research funding from the National Science Foundation for several projects, and has conducted research in Southern Mexico, the Caribbean, Ireland, and Australia.

for more: https://geography.as.uky.edu/users/geg207

RSVP: Link to RSVP Form

Facebook: Facebook Event

Questions? write to devsem at utoronto dot ca or facebook messenger @utdevsem or twitter handle @utdevsem

Sponsored by the Development Seminar at the University of Toronto

Like our Facebook Page to follow updates: facebook.com/utdevsem

Twitter Handle: @utdevsem, tweet using hashtag #devsem

Advertisements

Carpetbaggers of Kabul and Other American Afghan Entanglements

Past Events

Jennifer Fluri
Associate Professor, University of Colorado

Friday, March 9, 2018
12:00PM – 2:00PM
Department of Geography & Planning 
100 St. George Street, Room 5047, Toronto, ON M5S 3G3
Room SSH562

Abstract: This talk draws on Jennifer Fluri and Rachel Lehr’s co-authored book, focused on a critical analysis gender and international development in Afghanistan. In response to the attacks against the United States on 9/11/2001, the US led an international military invasion and occupation, along with extensive aid and development efforts. Gendered geopolitical discourses drew public attention to saving Afghan women from the Taliban and local patriarchy, which manifested into several gendered assistance programs and projects. In this talk, Fluri challenges the “saving women” narrative, by showing how “saving women” became a type of currency exchanged among organizations and how aid/development funds were wasted and assisted in the production of wealth for the few on the backs of the impoverished many.

Bio: Jennifer L. Fluri is an Associate Professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Colorado-Boulder. She is a feminist political geographer examining gender, geopolitics, international aid/development, conflict, and peace building in Afghanistan. She has published over twenty peer reviewed journal articles and in 2017 co-authored a book with Rachel Lehr entitled The Carpetbaggers of Kabul and other American-Afghan Entanglements, UGA Press, and she is one of four co-authors of the 2018 book Feminist Spaces: Gender and Geography in a Global Context, Routledge Press. In Colorado, she also co-leads the Boulder Affordable Housing Research Initiative, a community-based service-research project. For more: https://www.colorado.edu/geography/jennifer-fluri-0

RSVP: Link to RSVP Form

Facebook: Facebook Event

Questions? write to devsem at utoronto dot ca or facebook messenger @utdevsem or twitter handle @utdevsem

Sponsored by the Development Seminar at the University of Toronto

Like our Facebook Page to follow updates: facebook.com/utdevsem

Twitter Handle: @utdevsem, tweet using hashtag #devsem

The Politics of Roads and Mobility on Reunion Island​: Anthropology, Befuddlement and Climate Change

Past Events

Edward Simpson
Professor of Social Anthropology & Director, SOAS South Asia Institute
School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London

Date: Friday, April 6, 2018, 12-2pm

Venue: TBD

Abstract: This talk is given structure by the history and geography of a short stretch of ever-expanding road on the French island of Reunion. Transport produces around a quarter of global carbon emissions, of which cars belch the greatest proportion. Consequently, investment in roads increases carbon-powered traffic and runs counter to the direction climate change scientists and sections of the United Nations think we should be travelling. This material contributes a comparative case study to the literature on climate-change befuddlement and indecision, examining islandic debates about mobility, cars and roads to show how climate-change thought is influenced by the inertia of ideas and institutions, historical commitments and ways of understanding, and the ways power and opposition operate in any particular location. The material also shows that the first wave of climate-change anxiety has crashed onto the beach, its power, energy and persuasion now being sucked like white-noise back through the pebbles and out to open and untroubled waters, which, off the coast of Reunion at least, are inhabited by man-eating sharks.

Bio: Edward Simpson got his PhD at the London School of Economics (2001). He has held a lectureship at Goldsmiths College before moving to SOAS in 2007. Over this period, Simpson conducted extensive fieldwork in Gujarat, western India. Gradually, his research interests expanded to include first India and then South Asia. Simpson co-founded the Centre for Ethnographic Theory (CET) in 2016 and became Director of the SOAS South Asia Institute (SSAI) in 2017. For more, please refer to the speaker website

RSVP: TBD Soon

Facebook: TBD Soon

Questions? write to devsem at utoronto dot ca or facebook messenger @utdevsem or twitter handle @utdevsem

Sponsored by the Development Seminar at the University of Toronto

Like our Facebook Page to follow updates: facebook.com/utdevsem

Twitter Handle: @utdevsem, tweet using hashtag #devsem

Development: Business and Soft Power

Upcoming Events

Sue Roberts
Professor of Geography & Associate Provost for Internationalisation
University of Kentucky

Date: Thursday, March 29, 2018, 12-2pm

Venue: TBD

Abstract: This talk will focus on contemporary changes in the US’s foreign assistance for development practices. What does “America First” mean for US foreign aid? Is it the predicted “end of foreign aid as we know it”? (the title of an April 2017 article in Foreign Policy). I will revisit evidence and arguments I made in a 2014 paper in the Annals of the AAG about the rise of an industry of development firms involved in delivering US development assistance through contracts and sub-contracts with USAID.

Bio: Sue Roberts is Associate Provost for Internationalization at the University of Kentucky where she is also Professor of Geography. Sue is a specialist in economic and political geography, with interests in feminist and critical social theory. She has conducted research on a range of subjects, including offshore finance, international development assistance, globalizing non-governmental organizations, and geopolitics. She has published a co-authored book, two co-edited volumes, and numerous papers. Sue has won research funding from the National Science Foundation for several projects, and has conducted research in Southern Mexico, the Caribbean, Ireland, and Australia. From 2012-2017, she was an editor of the top-ranked journal Progress in Human Geography. Sue has spent periods of time living and working in England, Mexico, Australia and Finland. She was a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Turku, Finland in 2012-2013. And she has been Fulbright Specialist in South Africa, working with colleagues at the University of Western Cape.

RSVP: TBD Soon

Facebook: TBD Soon

Questions? write to devsem at utoronto dot ca or facebook messenger @utdevsem or twitter handle @utdevsem

Sponsored by the Development Seminar at the University of Toronto

Like our Facebook Page to follow updates: facebook.com/utdevsem

Twitter Handle: @utdevsem, tweet using hashtag #devsem

Geographies of bureaucratic labor

Past Events

Friday, January 12, 2018

12:00PM – 2:00PM

Department of Anthropology, AP246
19 Russel St
Toronto, M5S2S2

Abstract: The merger of CIDA and DFAIT, beginning in 2013 in the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade, and Development and continuing today in the renamed Global Affairs Canada (GAC), has brought personnel, resources, and ideas from the formerly independent CIDA into Canada’s diplomatic and trade apparatus. It has also produced tensions as the longstanding practices and expectations of two different sets of highly skilled but highly bureaucratized workers must be reworked around new departmental mandates, hierarchies, and spaces. I examine this merger by focusing on how the merged department and its personnel conceptualize, organize, and use expertise in the pursuit of development, diplomatic, and trade policy goals. Critical geographic scholarship has recently turned to the more mundane, quotidian, and regularized work of policy professionals in a variety of state spaces, such as foreign ministries and development agencies, as a way of understanding how policies are made and remade, changing relations between structure and agency in the internationalizing state, and how the work of development, diplomacy, and trade gets done. I focus here on the integration of and coordination between development personnel, expertise, and resources with their diplomatic and trade counterparts in GAC, looking especially at three interrelated themes: first, the meaning of expertise in different policy fields; second, the differentially embodied geographies of expertise in day-to-day bureaucratic work; and finally, the difference that workspace makes for this integration, both within the Ottawa region and in Canada’s embassies and other foreign field sites.

Speaker: Dr. Jamey Essex is Associate Professor in the department of political science at University of Windsor. His research concentrates on three broad areas: the political and economic geographies of globalization, focusing on changes in governance and the state; the geopolitics and geoeconomics of development, focusing on official development institutions and aid strategies; and the restructuring of agriculture and food systems at multiple scales, focusing on food security and hunger.

His primary ongoing research centers the geopolitics and geoeconomics of development and foreign aid, focusing on how official development assistance institutions frame and approach issues such as world hunger, food security, national security, and governance, and what their strategic choices mean for institutional structures and relations. Past research has looked especially at the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) and the US Agency for International Development (USAID), as well as the international development system more broadly, and has been funded by grants from the University of Windsor and SSHRC. Dr. Essex currently holds a SSHRC Insight Grant to examine the recent amalgamation of CIDA and Canada’s Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) and what this means for development, foreign affairs, and trade experts, expertise, and policy within the Canadian state.

For more, visit http://www1.uwindsor.ca/polsci/dr-jamey-essex

Sponsored by the Development Seminar at the University of Toronto

Registration Link: http://anthropology.utoronto.ca/departmental-events/

Like our Facebook Page to follow updates: facebook.com/utdevsem

Twitter Handle: @utdevsem, tweet using hashtag #devsem

Worldliness as Decolonization

Past Events

Friday, November 24, 2017

12:00PM – 2:00PM

Department of Anthropology, AP246
19 Russel St
Toronto, M5S2S2

Abstract: The foundational demand of the new student movement that emerged at South African universities in 2015 is the decolonisation of education and the university. For some this has seemed an anachronistic demand, drawing on an older register of politics from the struggles for independence from colonial rule in the 1940s-60s. Yet the students’ invocation of the term has been an attempt to define not only an ongoing colonial paradigm in curriculum and knowledge production at universities, but also to diagnose a problem in the relationship between university and the social context in which it operates. Conversations about how to respond to this demand have been varied, but one rich seam of conversation has been to interpret decolonisation as a claim on worldliness, on how disciplinary and departmental life can open into a different kind of relationship with students’ lives, with the social contexts in which the university as institution functions, and with anti-hegemonic practice.

Speaker: Kelly Gillespie is Chair of the Department of Anthropology at the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits). She is a political and legal anthropologist with a research focus on criminal justice in South Africa, and is particularly concerned with the ways in which criminal justice has become a vector for the continuation of apartheid relations. She also writes and teaches about urbanism, sexualities, race and the praxis of social justice. She co-founded the Johannesburg Workshop in Theory and Criticism (JWTC), an experimental project based in Johannesburg tasked with recrafting the work of critical theory beyond the global north. Dr Gillespie also works beyond the university in popular education projects supporting a range of social justice formations in Southern Africa.

Co-sponsored by the Development Seminar and the Anthropology Colloquium, Department of Anthropology at the University of Toronto

Registration Link: http://anthropology.utoronto.ca/departmental-events/

Like our Facebook Page to follow updates: facebook.com/utdevsem

Twitter Handle: @utdevsem, tweet using hashtag #devsem #decolonization

Neoliberalism’s Commodifications

Past Events

Friday, November 03, 2017

12:00PM – 2:00PM

Department of Anthropology, AP367
19 Russel St
Toronto, M5S2S2

Abstract: The idea that the world is moving towards, or has already arrived at, a condition often referred to as “the commodification of everything” has become a staple of media, activist, and scholarly commentary in the early 21st century. Critical political economists have variously identified the commodification of everything as an empirical condition characteristic of mature capitalism, as a structural tendency inherent to capitalist social relations, and as an neoliberal ideological project. In this talk, I challenge the idea that universal commodification is a neoliberal goal in two ways: by inquiring into what the implications of the existence of markets for everything would be for market relations themselves, and by asking why it is that neoliberal states and international institutions criminalize and pathologize a wide range of markets that have flourished in some non-neoliberal societies. I focus in particular on possible markets in some of the most fundamental elements of human societies, including violence, power, and credentials, and draw on empirical evidence from early modern Europe and contemporary Eastern Asia.

Speaker: Derek Hall is Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science and the Balsillie School of International Affairs at Wilfrid Laurier University. His research interests include the political economy of food, agriculture, land and the environment in Eastern Asia, and the theory and history of capitalism. He is the author of Land (Polity, 2013) and, with Philip Hirsch and Tania Murray Li, of Powers of Exclusion: Land Dilemmas in Southeast Asia (NUS Press and University of Hawai’i Press, 2011). In 2009-10 he was an S.V. Ciriacy-Wantrup Research Fellow at the University of California Berkeley.

Co-sponsored by the Development Seminar and the Centre for South East Asian Studies in the Asian Institute at the University of Toronto

Website:
https://utdevsem.wordpress.com/2017/10/25/neoliberalisms-commodifications/

Registration Link: http://anthropology.utoronto.ca/events/devsem-derek-hall/

Like our Facebook Page to follow updates: facebook.com/utdevsem

Twitter Handle: @utdevsem, hashtag #devsem

 

 

“LAZY JAPANESE” AND “DEGRADED KOREANS”: DOES CULTURE MATTER IN EXPLAINING ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT?

Past Events

Friday, September 29, 2017

12:00PM – 2:00PM

University College, Room 179
15 King’s College Circle
Toronto, M5S3H7

Culture has been frequently mentioned as an explanation for Asian successes in economic development. Typical is the comment by Samuel Huntington, the author of the controversial book, The Clash of Civilisations, offered as an explanation of the economic divergence between South Korea and Ghana, two countries that were at similar levels of economic development in the 1960s, argued: “Undoubtedly, many factors played a role, but … culture had to be a large part of the explanation. South Koreans valued thrift, investment, hard work, education, organisation, and discipline. Ghanaians had different values. In short, cultures count”.
In this talk, Ha-Joon Chang will argue that those arguments trying to explain international differences in economic development in terms of cultural differences are often ignorant, usually fail to take a dynamic view of culture, and are invariably based on simplistic theories.

Professor Ha-Joon Chang is the economist at the University of Cambridge. In addition to numerous journal articles and book chapters, he has published 16 authored books (five co-authored) and 10 edited books. His main books include The Political Economy of Industrial Policy (Palgrave Macmillan UK, 1996), Kicking Away the Ladder (Anthem Pr, 2002), Bad Samaritans (Bloomsbury Press, 2009), 23 Things They Don’t Tell You About Capitalism (Bloomsbury Press, 2012), and Economics: The User’s Guide (Bloomsbury Press, 2014). By 2018, his writings will have been translated and published in 41 languages and 44 countries. Worldwide, his books have sold 2 million copies. He is the winner of the 2003 Gunnar Myrdal Prize and the 2005 Wassily Leontief Prize. He was ranked no. 9 in the Prospect magazine’s World Thinkers 2014 poll.

Registration:  http://uoft.me/economicdevelopment

Speakers

Ha-Joon Chang
Speaker
Economist & Author Reader, Department of Political Economy of Development, University of Cambridge

Nick Li
Commentator
Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, University of Toronto

Paul Kingston
Chair
Director, Political Science and IDS, University of Toronto

Main Sponsor

Asian Institute

Co-Sponsors

Centre for Critical Development Studies, UTSC

Development Seminar at University of Toronto

Department of Political Science, UTSG

A Remittance Forest in Java; Turning Migrant Labour into Agrarian Capital

Past Events

Development Seminar co-sponsored by Centre for Southeast Asian Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs

Prof. Nancy Lee Peluso (Henry J. Vaux Distinguished Professor of Forest Policy at Berkeley University of California)

March 31st, 12-2pm,

AP 246, 19 Russell St.

Lunch will be served in the Faculty Lounge at 12:00pm; Talk begins at 12:30pm.

Register here: http://anthropology.utoronto.ca/events/devsem-nancy-peluso/

Entangled Territories in Small-scale Gold Frontiers: Labor Practices, Property, and Secrets in Indonesian Gold Country

Past Events

Entangled Territories in Small-scale Gold Frontiers: Labor Practices, Property, and Secrets in Indonesian Gold Country

Prof. Nancy Lee Peluso (Henry J. Vaux Distinguished Professor of Forest Policy at Berkeley University of California)

Co-sponsored by the Development Seminar and the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies.

March 31st, 3-5pm
AP246, 19 Russell Street.
Abstract
Small-scale gold mining territories emerge at the nexus of land use, property, and labor relations in some of Indonesian Borneo’s most vibrant and populated spaces, entangling state actors while sitting comfortably beyond the reach of formal state authority. Based on seven months of field research in a key gold-producing region of West Kalimantan, I argue that gold’s presence, discovery, and informal extraction creates resource frontiers, and that within these frontiers, mining labor, property relations, and gold mining-related secret knowledges converge to generate resource territories. While development practitioners, agrarian scholars, and government officials represent mining sites as chaotic and lacking institutional order, I show that a clearly understood organization of life and work animates the territorial subjects and territorialized spaces that small-scale mining populates in both urban and rural mining territories. The article challenges views of territory and territorialization as an imposition of government on the people and resources within spatial boundaries. Territories with no formalized boundaries   in Indonesian gold country emerge through specific production practices engaging labor, resource access, and situated knowledges. The complex entanglements of legalities and illegalities suggest that smallholder gold production spaces are ungovernable through centralized state regulatory institutions.

This is a discussion-based workshop, based on prior reading of Prof. Peluso’s paper. Please register here. To obtain a copy of the paper, please contact lukas.ley@mail.utoronto.ca.